Spark Problem Stage
Scanning a WordPress plugin or theme for unused functions

Make it possible to easily identify unused functions in a WordPress plugin or theme by running a WP-CLI command.

Idea
Programmatically editing a wp-config.php file

Editing a wp-config.php file programmatically is imprecise and error-prone, when it ideally would be as easy as running a WP-CLI command.

Idea
Using WP-CLI through a web browser

Offer users the ability to run WP-CLI commands in the browser, without necessarily granting SSH access.

Idea
Creating a database snapshot automatically before any database transformation

To prevent catastrophic data loss, it would be helpful if WP-CLI magically detected when your command might perform some database operation, and created a snapshot immediately prior.

Idea
Using WP-CLI without SSH access to the server

Many hosts don’t permit accessing a WordPress install over SSH, limiting your ability to use WP-CLI.

Idea
Syncing a database from another environment

Pulling a database from production into local is still a multi-step process, when it could be a one-step process.

Idea
Performing a full site backup

If I don’t want to install a WordPress plugin, backing up my site to Amazon S3 or Google Drive involves a ton of gnarly bash scripting.

Idea
Scaffolding a Behat test suite for a WordPress plugin or theme

Although Behat tests are quite easy to write, setting up a Behat test suite for a WordPress plugin or theme is still a barrier to entry for most.

Idea
Profiling WordPress performance issues

When WordPress is loading slowly and you don’t know why, it would be helpful to have a WP-CLI command that profiled the bootstrap process and identified causes of slowness.

Idea
Diagnosing problems with WordPress

When WordPress is behaving badly and you don’t know why, it would be neat to have a WP-CLI command that ran hundreds of diagnostic checks to identify common problems.

Idea