Quickly identify what’s slow with WordPress.

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Overview

wp profile monitors key performance indicators of the WordPress execution process to help you quickly identify points of slowness.

Save hours diagnosing slow WordPress sites. Because you can easily run it on any server that supports WP-CLI, wp profile compliments Xdebug and New Relic by pointing you in the right direction for further debugging. Because runs on the command line, using wp profile means you don’t have to install a plugin and deal with the painful dashboard of a slow WordPress site. And, because it’s a WP-CLI command, wp profile makes it easy to perfom hard tasks (e.g. profiling a WP REST API response).

Identify why WordPress is slow in just a few steps with wp profile.

Using

This package implements the following commands:

wp profile stage

Profile each stage of the WordPress load process (bootstrap, main_query, template).

wp profile stage [<stage>] [--all] [--spotlight] [--url=<url>] [--fields=<fields>] [--format=<format>]

When WordPress handles a request from a browser, it’s essentially
executing as one long PHP script. wp profile stage breaks the script
into three stages:

  • bootstrap is where WordPress is setting itself up, loading plugins
    and the main theme, and firing the init hook.
  • main_query is how WordPress transforms the request (e.g. /2016/10/21/moms-birthday/)
    into the primary WP_Query.
  • template is where WordPress determines which theme template to
    render based on the main query, and renders it.
# `wp profile stage` gives an overview of each stage.
$ wp profile stage --fields=stage,time,cache_ratio
+------------+---------+-------------+
| stage      | time    | cache_ratio |
+------------+---------+-------------+
| bootstrap  | 0.7994s | 93.21%      |
| main_query | 0.0123s | 94.29%      |
| template   | 0.792s  | 91.23%      |
+------------+---------+-------------+
| total (3)  | 1.6037s | 92.91%      |
+------------+---------+-------------+

# Then, dive into hooks for each stage with `wp profile stage <stage>`
$ wp profile stage bootstrap --fields=hook,time,cache_ratio --spotlight
+--------------------------+---------+-------------+
| hook                     | time    | cache_ratio |
+--------------------------+---------+-------------+
| muplugins_loaded:before  | 0.2335s | 40%         |
| muplugins_loaded         | 0.0007s | 50%         |
| plugins_loaded:before    | 0.2792s | 77.63%      |
| plugins_loaded           | 0.1502s | 100%        |
| after_setup_theme:before | 0.068s  | 100%        |
| init                     | 0.2643s | 96.88%      |
| wp_loaded:after          | 0.0377s |             |
+--------------------------+---------+-------------+
| total (7)                | 1.0335s | 77.42%      |
+--------------------------+---------+-------------+

OPTIONS

[<stage>]
	Drill down into a specific stage.

[--all]
	Expand upon all stages.

[--spotlight]
	Filter out logs with zero-ish values from the set.

[--url=<url>]
	Execute a request against a specified URL. Defaults to the home URL.

[--fields=<fields>]
	Limit the output to specific fields. Default is all fields.

[--format=<format>]
	Render output in a particular format.
	---
	default: table
	options:
	  - table
	  - json
	  - yaml
	  - csv
	---

wp profile hook

Profile key metrics for WordPress hooks (actions and filters).

wp profile hook [<hook>] [--all] [--spotlight] [--url=<url>] [--fields=<fields>] [--format=<format>]

In order to profile callbacks on a specific hook, the action or filter
will need to execute during the course of the request.

OPTIONS

[<hook>]
	Drill into key metrics of callbacks on a specific WordPress hook.

[--all]
	Profile callbacks for all WordPress hooks.

[--spotlight]
	Filter out logs with zero-ish values from the set.

[--url=<url>]
	Execute a request against a specified URL. Defaults to the home URL.

[--fields=<fields>]
	Display one or more fields.

[--format=<format>]
	Render output in a particular format.
	---
	default: table
	options:
	  - table
	  - json
	  - yaml
	  - csv
	---

wp profile eval

Profile arbitrary code execution.

wp profile eval <php-code> [--fields=<fields>] [--format=<format>]

Code execution happens after WordPress has loaded entirely, which means
you can use any utilities defined in WordPress, active plugins, or the
current theme.

OPTIONS

<php-code>
	The code to execute, as a string.

[--fields=<fields>]
	Display one or more fields.

[--format=<format>]
	Render output in a particular format.
	---
	default: table
	options:
	  - table
	  - json
	  - yaml
	  - csv
	---

wp profile eval-file

Profile execution of an arbitrary file.

wp profile eval-file <file> [--fields=<fields>] [--format=<format>]

File execution happens after WordPress has loaded entirely, which means
you can use any utilities defined in WordPress, active plugins, or the
current theme.

OPTIONS

<file>
	The path to the PHP file to execute and profile.

[--fields=<fields>]
	Display one or more fields.

[--format=<format>]
	Render output in a particular format.
	---
	default: table
	options:
	  - table
	  - json
	  - yaml
	  - csv
	---

Installing

wp profile is available to runcommand gold and silver subscribers, or you can purchase a single-seat updates and support subscription for $129 per year.

Once you’ve signed up, you can download the latest version from your account dashboard. Then, install wp profile with:

$ wp package install profile.zip

If you have a Github developer seat, you can also run:

$ wp package install [email protected]:runcommand/profile.git

See documentation for alternative installation instructions.

Support

Support (either through Github issues or via email) is available to paying runcommand customers.

Have access to Sparks, the runcommand Github issue tracker? Feel free to open a new issue. Keep in mind Sparks is semi-public (multiple companies have access to it); please use email support for anything that needs to be kept private.

Think you’ve found a bug? Before you create a new issue, you should search existing issues to see if there’s an existing resolution to it, or if it’s already been fixed in a newer version. Once you’ve done a bit of searching and discovered there isn’t an open or fixed issue for your bug, please create a new issue with description of what you were doing, what you saw, and what you expected to see.

Want to contribute a new feature? Please first open a new issue to discuss whether the feature is a good fit for the project. Once you’ve decided to work on a pull request, please include functional tests and follow the WordPress Coding Standards.

Don’t have access to Sparks, or need to keep the discussion private? You can also email [email protected] with general questions, bug reports, and feature suggestions.